Rumpus Essays Editor, Roxane Gay, will be in conversation with Rumpus contributor Sari Botton at Community Bookstore in Brooklyn, May 6. RSVP on the Facebook Page. Sponsored by the lovely people at Volume 1 Brooklyn.

maudnewton:

communitybookstore:

Who’s excited for our Helen Oyeyemi party on March 7th?

Obviously I am! Join us if you can, and either way read this book.

AHHHHHHHH

penamerican:

This is TONIGHT. If you’re going to one holiday party this season, it should be this one. Guests include Edgar Keret, Sarah Vowell, Starlee Kline, Emma Straub, and more! Plus, free beer! All proceeds from the door go to PEN. We’re really excited!! Join us!!

Come to this!

penamerican:

This is TONIGHT. If you’re going to one holiday party this season, it should be this one. Guests include Edgar Keret, Sarah Vowell, Starlee Kline, Emma Straub, and more! Plus, free beer! All proceeds from the door go to PEN. We’re really excited!! Join us!!

Come to this!

Now all of her friends chime in. They whisper words under their breath, but what bothers me more is their physical intimidation. The girls press at me until I wedge myself between people blocking the door and exit the subway car. I can feel myself sweating underneath my suit. When I was in middle school, a girl in gym class slapped me in the face, leaving a red welt. We were all in the locker room where we kept our uniforms—blue shorts and a white shirt—in metal baskets with a lock. I involuntarily cried; I had never been hit before. I went home and told my mother. “Some people are hit like that every day,” she said.

The Girls Do Cute Things by Jessica Pishko

ebonymag:

Recent college grad Chika Dunu laments the changes in her native land:

"My Brooklyn was the outline of hopscotch sketched into sidewalks with colored chalk; loud chants of “arrreee-youuuu-readyyyy-readyyy-steaddyy…” and double-dutch battles. It was water ferociously pouring from fire hydrants; late nights sitting on the trunk of someone’s hoopty; the sounds of ambulance, police sirens combined with lilting accents.  It wasn’t the Brooklyn of Lena Dunham‘s Girls, a post Sex and the City​ mini-Manhattan. In fact, they avoided it at all cost. It wasn’t trendy based off real estate and infrastructure, but was cool because Biggie said it was. Hell, it was cool just because. We said so.

But that is old-school Brooklyn. Today it stands unrecognizable. I’ve circled blocks in search of parking and in that moment realized most isn’t the same. Where is the character? The air is different. My childhood has been practically erased.”

Notes from Gentrified Brooklyn - EBONY

melvillehouse:

Hey Brooklyn. Kate Zambreno found this cat outside of our offices in DUMBO after a reading last night. It needs a home. Preferably a home built to withstand frankly dangerous levels of cuteness. Get in touch if you can take it in.

If you are in New York and want this adorable kitten, hit Melville House up. (I hope it gets its own Cocteau before it leaves, though.)

“We tried to be writers in Brooklyn. We hosted a reading series that was written-up in the places you’d want your little poetry reading series to be written-up, made hand-bound poetry chapbooks and a literary magazine with an excruciatingly DIY screen-printed cover. We were living the Brooklyn life: downing dirty martinis and whiskeys to close the bar at 4 a.m., sleeping until 1 the next day and nursing hangovers with greasy BLTs and omelets of pure gluttony, then off to another reading, another show, another museum opening, then Monday morning and the subway ride into Midtown, SoHo, Union Square (there were so many entry level jobs) not really making enough to pay rent.”
Diamonds And Rust #1: Nostalgia, Form And Noise by Katy Henriksen, The Rumpus's Music Editor.
“A South Side Chicago girl (Chatham to be precise) with college-educated parents, my mother gave directives to her female offspring that were very clear: get good grades, do a stint in Jack and Jill, go to college, avoid out-of-wedlock births, procure a good job and, perhaps later, a husband and children. In that exact order.

Selina is given similar instructions from her mother, who dreams of owning a Brooklyn brownstone: join the Barbadian church group, get good grades, become a doctor, meet an “acceptable” guy—a member of the community—and buy a brownstone. In that exact order. Though the story focuses on Selina’s coming of age in terms of her ethnicity, class, and sexuality (it is no accident that subsequent editions of the book were published by The Feminist Press at the City University of New York), it is Silla’s dreams of owning a brownstone that haunt me.”

The Last Book I Loved: Brown Girl, Brownstones - The Rumpus.net

Have you read last week’s Last Book I Loved pick yet? Get on it!